The True Meaning of Ka-ching!; or, 51 Cowboy Facts, Continued

by cowboylands

The End of the Trail, by Peter Field

cover illus. Earl Bergey

Pocket Book, 1945

from the collection of ES

 

36. Anybody can wear cowboy boots; it’s the person who wears spurs who commands attention.*

* Although, outside of a rodeo, a horse show, a trail ride, a ranch, or some serious two-step action, who would wear them? Never mind–go with it. 

35. The verb “to spur” hurts, just saying it. It has visceral meaning. Use it often. 

34. The sound of spurs makes everyone freeze and hear a western spaghetti western melody. Try it and watch your enemies fade into the sunset. Fast. 

33. Spurs are made of leather and metal shafts and spiked wheels and buckles. Yowza! 

The back cover of The End of the Trail says it all: “…back in action…AGAIN!”

That’s what spurs mean. 

 

I just got back from the West (okay, western Pennsylvania) and had a yearning to make things happen, hence the spurs. The above illustration is by Earl Bergey, who singlehandedly created the famed and censored “nipple cover” of Popular Library’s The Private Life of Helen of Troy.  [Can’t find an image of this–but you have to see it to believe it!] He knows how to titillate. 

Below is a much tamer version of a pair of spurs I bought at auction off a highway in Wyoming.  

Spurs, copyright 2008

I was titillated by their utilitarian heft and their spare and clean line. A pair of spurs makes things happen, no matter what venue you use to dig them in. Although I don’t recommend digging them into someone’s hand unless you have a “safe” word. Play nice, folks. 

 

 

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Leave a Comment to “The True Meaning of Ka-ching!; or, 51 Cowboy Facts, Continued”

  1. zowie!! zowie!!!!!!
    (that’s my safe word)

    ZOWWWWWIIIIIIIEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE

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